Tag: flute practice tips

Bulletproof Musician’s 8 Things Top Practicers Do

September 28, 2014 at 2:58 pmCategory:Practicing the Flute

I’m always looking for new and better ways to make my practicing better so I often read the Bulletproof Musician blog to see what new advice he has to share. Check out his newest post to see how your practicing methods compare with the 8 top methods identified in a recent study.



Intonation in Action Coming Up!

January 23, 2014 at 11:29 pmCategory:Uncategorized

It has been forever since my last post, but I have been productive in the meantime and more will be appearing here. I’m conducting two flute choirs now and the orchestra I play in has started up again, so I’ve been trying to balance all that while not overextending myself TOO much.

So, the Florida Flute Convention is this weekend and I’ll be conducting a performance by the Tampa Bay Flute Choir and presenting Intonation in Action, an extension of all the intonation stuff I post about. It has taken forever to come up with the structure of this particular presentation, but, by Jove, I think I’ve got it! If you read this after seeing the presentation, I’d be thrilled to hear what you think. And if you can’t be there and want to know what this is all about, contact me through the website and I’ll send you the PowerPoint, but only if you promise to give some feedback.

More next week, after I catch my breath. Happy Fluting!


Intonation in Action at the Florida Flute Fair 2014

November 6, 2013 at 10:29 pmCategory:Uncategorized

Yay! My proposal to present at the 2014 Florida Flute Fair has been accepted so I will be presenting a workshop on Intonation in Action. I will also conducting my flute choir, the Tampa Bay Flute Choir, at this year’s event, so I will be busy in January!

The workshop will involve audience members in demonstrations and techniques that I use to work on intonation in playing situations. This isn’t about being able to hit a target on a meter; it is about learning how to develop intonation awareness and develop the ability to respond to changing pitch contexts. Exercise and develop those intonation reflexes!!

More about this later. You know I can’t keep from talking about intonation stuff! Check out more about the Florida Flute Association and the yearly convention here:


Emmanuel Pahud plays Berio and some Bach

October 20, 2013 at 5:04 pmCategory:Flute Treats

An excellent musician must be able to play music from many genres and styles. Emmanuel Pahud demonstrates his mastery of the flute and of one of the classics of the flute repertoire in this video of a performance of Luciano Berio’s Sequenza I for solo flute.

To hear Pahud playing something more conventional, listen to his recording of a Bach standard, the Corrente from the Partita.

These examples only go to show that when it comes to the study of music, there is always more to explore and learn. You should never be bored when there are so many different styles to indulge in and conquer!


Practice Diary 7/29

July 31, 2013 at 6:46 pmCategory:Practice Diary | Uncategorized

EJ4 from GbM to am
-clipped articulation exercise is easier if I remember to pause and expel excess air
-don’t practicing straining, you already know how to do that!
-overall focus is good, air doesn’t wander as much, especially when I think of playing out to an audience
-remember to push for better, it is easy to go with OK, to forget there can be much more, push for better!

CPE Bach am solo sonata
-the big leaps downward in the 3rd movement, the air attacks seem OK, but when articulation is added, notes are still not as clear as a pianist might be
-tried slurring through the figures, maybe the problem is the disturbance of the air on repeated notes, jaw and embouchure are opening on the 2nd note in the group, having to get back into position to play
-this is a case of expression getting in the way of technique
-opening in embouchure is too wide, how to address that; haven’t found a way that is effective for me yet
-feel like I’m just getting going when the timer goes off. tomorrow – 45 minutes!